Ready Set Charette Logo

Another day, another opportunity to introduce you to our stellar students participating in the IIDA Student Charette at NeoCon!

Adrian_CardenasAdrian Cardenas is a senior at the University of North Texas.

Adrian looks forward to specializing in hospitality design as according to him, “hospitality design has a sense of glamour, but is still technical and custom designed for the brand.”

He draws inspiration from numerous outlets but notes that his favorite space is The Stoneleigh Boutique Hotel in Dallas. Adrian used the hotel for his senior project as he found the building was fascinating, beautiful and full of history.  “this space is nostalgic and has a gorgeous historical ambiance.”

Ymani_TannisYmani Tannis is a senior at the Art Institute of Atlanta, and she knew she wanted to be an interior designer since she was a kid!

“When I was a child, I always played on the game SIMS simply to build and design their homes. For hours I would stay on the computer doing this, and because of this my mom told me I was destined to be an interior designer!”

Now that Ymani is older, she draws her inspiration from other sources. Her favorite source of inspiration is Frank Gehry. Although he is an architect, Ymani finds his designs for the exterior of buildings very artistic and sculptural.

Be sure to check out their work at the IIDA Student Charette on Tuesday, June 11th at booth space 7-2105. We look forward to seeing you there!

Ready, Set, Charette!

Ready Set Charette LogoYou may have already heard about NeoCon’s wildly popular student event–the IIDA Student Charette. During this event teams of students from across the country are combined into teams of five, presented with one design challenge and given six hours to execute it and present before an esteemed panel of judges.

In the coming weeks, we will be introducing you to these stellar students who will have their design skills put to the test on June 11th!

Today we are excited to introduce you to Alexandra Leigh

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Alexandra Leigh is a rising senior at Virginia Commonwealth University saw the value in an IIDA Student Membership right away! IIDA gave her the opportunity to network and further strengthen her leadership skills.

As a student, Alexandra draws her design inspiration from a variety of outlets.

“I recently discovered a firm in Oklahoma, Fitzsimmons Architects, and I really enjoy all of their work and their approach.  They’re blurring the lines between art and architecture, and I appreciate that their designs inspire me to think and observe.  Also, they designed a house for Wayne Coyne from the Flaming Lips, which is just awesome!”

Her design inspiration and passion also comes from a source a little closer to home.

“My mom has been redesigning our home for the last 19 years of my life.  I always enjoyed watching her have those “light bulb” moments when she came up with new projects.  I think constantly being around the renovations and changing environment gave me an appreciation and understanding of interior design that many other artists don’t have.”

 

5 Things You Need To Know
 
….ABOUT ENTERING DESIGN COMPETITIONS

5 Things You Need To KnowYou Can’t Lose
By entering one or several projects into a design competition, there is no direction to go but up. Putting forth your work and having people see it, read it, and experience it can help you as a student and professional in several ways. As a student, you gain insight into how projects are judged and what is deemed great design, and as a professional you send your work to professionally successful and influential judges that critique it. You may even get to meet these judges and other professionals that attend the competition event to announce the winners (if the competition indeed decides to host the event); yet another conduit to showcase your work, and yourself.

5 Things You Need To KnowThey Make Your Work Better
Like a workshop or group review where peers, professors, and / or professionals listen to you describe and articulate your work and then provide you with constructive feedback, a competition provides a chance for you to showcase and obtain criticism and interpret your work’s worth. Knowing ahead of time that you are submitting to a competition also creates in you a sense of awareness that others – most notably, judges – are going to review your work. It makes you internally motivated to design a project that reflects your most advanced skills because you want it to impress and have people comment on it positively.

5 Things You Need To KnowThey Encourage Efficiency
Keeping yourself organized and managing your schedule are skills all designers benefit from, and if you schedule appropriate time to submit to competitions it helps you prioritize and work more efficiently. Design competitions have specific parameters and submission requirements you must tailor your submittal to, so making sure you know exactly what you need to submit as a competition deliverable(s) is important (especially when negotiating time between school and work responsibilities). Often, competitions ask for a combination of design renders and plans, as well as a succinct and clear written component describing your project.

5 Things You Need To KnowYou Become Involved
Design competitions do a great job of involving and engaging their participants. Whether it’s through e-mail, social media, or door drops, competition participants gain access to a design network where they can keep tabs on competition deadlines, see who is judging, find where and when the competition winners are announced, and of course (the fun stuff) what they receive for winning. In addition, competitions relay other entrants’ work, winning or otherwise (with approval), which gives participants a great idea of “what’s out there” and what you can expand upon in your own projects.

5 Things You Need To KnowYou Gain Affirmation, or Reaffirmation
Personally, I’ve entered several design competitions and lost all except one. The one I placed in gave me an affirming feeling that my design skills were, in a sense, acceptable – that the work I did was given a stamp of approval that said, “Yes, this is good design.” As creative people, we consistently put work “out there” that (hopefully) reflects our best design abilities and intentions, while acting as little parts of ourselves. When your design registers with a select panel of judges and you’re listed as a finalist, your career wayfinding becomes clear and the project you devoted so much personal time to is given its time in the sun. It’s an affirming, or reaffirming, feeling that your design inspired meaning in someone – a crucial effect our creations strive to engender.

Hooked on Salon

When we hear the word salon, most of us think of this:

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However, our aim here does not concern perms, blowouts, or conditioning treatments. It’s about starting your own interior design salon.

Another definition of salon is a gathering of people. Specifically, a gathering to discuss, titillate, amuse, and exchange ideas. Most often, a salon focuses on a single topic or discipline, and brings together people sharing a thread between them – a group of writers, theorists, scientists, etc. However, the more diverse and eclectic a group is, often the more stimulating the conversation.

Salon gatherings began in the 16th century when upper-class intellectuals met formerly within large reception halls or personal mansions to exchange opinions about history, literature, and cultural issues. Over time, salons evolved from upper crust decorum in favor of spontaneity and free-flowing conversation.

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Yet, the founding principles of salons are extended to today where idealistic, honest, radical, and unique conversations and debates form through gathering like or unlike minds in the egalitarian purpose of developing new ideas out a discipline, or out of an immediate or worldly issue.

Whether it is hosted by a specific person or held in a specific location, think about how YOU can start your own salon with friends, friends of friends, classmates, instructors, and professionals. This can plug you into a unique and fun social group, and provide you with innovative, collaborative ideas for your interior design mind and career. Make sure to think about using your IIDA Campus Center for help with organizing, creating, and scheduling a salon. Email us at socialmedia@iida.org if you do organize a salon, we’d love to promote it!

One of the more historically famous salons featured Ernest Hemingway, Gertrude Stein, and Pablo Picasso (think Midnight in Paris) gathering under one roof, sharing thoughts and influencing each other’s work – all in the name of expanding and bettering their professional and personal goals. You can start on that path too by starting your own salon; just make sure people know it isn’t a curl-up and color treatment opportunity.

Images Sources:

http://alluresalonandspa.biz/page/1nb40/MONTHLY_SPECIALS.html

IIDA in Italy

IIDA is excited to welcome IIDA Milan as its 32nd Chapter! The addition of Milan further underscores IIDA’s mission to support American and international interior designers, and grow IIDA’s global community and network.

IIDA Executive Vice President and CEO, Cheryl Durst, and Senior Vice President, Dennis Krause visited the Milan chapter this week to help usher in IIDA’s newest hub.

IIDA and Milan....UNITE!

IIDA and Milan….UNITE!

Milan becomes an IIDA chapter at a timely moment when the EmergeItaly competition winners were announced. IIDA, with FederlegnoArredo and the Italian Minister of Economic Development, created the EmergeItaly competition to recognize and celebrate the next generation of young design professionals whose product designs are innovative, functional, and original.

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This year, Honorable Mention was awarded to Miguel Brovhn for “O-Series” and Sarah Turner for “Flight.” The “O-Series” combines flexibility with linearity, and “Flight” converges classic American design with Italian minimalism.

Best of Competition was awarded to Angel Beale for the “Folds Series” design concept. Beale’s design will be produced by an Italian design company and exhibited at the 2014 Salone Internazionale del Mobile. Additionally, all winners won a trip to Milan to attend the 2013 Salone Internazionale del Mobile.

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For more information on all winners visit the IIDA website. Congratulations to Miguel, Sarah, and Angel, as well as the new Milan Chapter!

Ready, Set, CHARETTE!

During NeoCon, IIDA hosts an annual Student Design Charette pitting student teams against the clock to produce a project in one work day that creatively solves a design problem they receive that morning. Students are invited from IIDA Campus Centers all over the country and placed in teams with students they’ve never met before. The results produce amazingly inventive design solutions, and provide a one-of-a-kind experience for students.

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(photos of the 2012 IIDA Student Design Charette at NeoCon)

However, exactly what is a charette? Prior to interning at IIDA, I did not know what a charette was. I had heard it used in conversations, but never had the opportunity to learn what it actually meant.

The original word charette (shuh-ret) is French for “cart” or “chariot,” and is oftentimes times spelled with two r’s as charrette. The process of charette is thought to originate from the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris, France during the 19th century when the word was adapted by student architects when they arduously worked on a project close to the end of a term or specific deadline until a cart, or charette, was wheeled in to pick up their work for review. Since then, the process of charette has aligned itself with working tirelessly up until a deadline.

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In today’s world, we’ve honed the definition and process of a charette to be a collaborative brainstorm in which a group of designers drafts a solution to a design problem within a limited time to present internally, to clients, or to a panel of judges (as is the case with IIDA’s Student Design Charette). Regardless of the cause or motivation, a charette is an extremely beneficial process that collaboratively harnesses the talents of the group to plan, create, and substantiate a design solution in the interest of a client, group, or community.

As we near the three days of NeoCon in June, stay tuned for more information on IIDA’s 2013 Student Design Charette, and when and where to visit the IIDA booth to observe the process and results of the IIDA Student Design Charette.

Image Sources:
http://paulinka-blog.blogspot.com/2009_11_01_archive.html

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IIDA would like to announce its inaugural “Clash of the Classics!” This tournament of personal taste pitches classically well-known and inventive chairs against each other with you, the voters, choosing which classic chair owns the throne.

Here’s how it works:

  • 16 chairs are arranged in a bracket with two chairs squaring off in each match-up (shown below)
  • Voting will take place on the IIDA DesignMatters blog with IIDA’s Facebook and blog followers choosing which chair they like more, and the chair with the most votes advances to the next round
  • The final match-up, slated for March 29th, will determine which chair owns the throne

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CLICK TO ENLARGE

Schedule of Rounds:

  • Round 1 = March 19 + 20
  • Round 2 = March 21 + 22
  • Round 3 = March 27 + 28
  • Championship = March 29

It’s IIDA’s twist on March Madness, and we can’t wait to get started. Stay tuned next week on Tuesday, March 19th when we kick off the First Round!

Please note: chairs do not reflect IIDA’s endorsement of any designer, company or manufacturer.